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Showing posts from February, 2016

First Annual Best New British and Irish Poets Anthology POETS ANNOUNCED!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – 15 February 2016 


50 Rising Stars Win Spots in the First Annual Best New British and Irish Poets Anthology

Judged by Kelly Davio, Senior Poetry Editor, Eyewear Publishing LTD, and Todd Swift, Series Editor. 

Modeled on the famous United States competition, the first annual Best New British and Irish Poets competition was open to any poet of British or Irish citizenship and/or U.K. or Irish residency who has not yet published or will not publish a full-length collection prior to 1 June 2016. Poems submitted for consideration could have appeared in print before, or in a pamphlet, but not online. Poets about to have full collections out from Eyewear Publishing, including Ben Parker and Maria Apichella, were ineligible for inclusion.
A large number of poems came in from all corners of Great Britain and from across Ireland, from thrilling new voices and established older writers – all poets likely to soon publish full collections in print. These poets are, if you like, …

TRUMP UPS THE STAKES

Donald Trump is usually wrong in his manner and his statements, goes the thinking of most British people - and he may well be. However last night in the widely-televised Republican Presidential candidates debate in South Carolina, Mr Trump, no stranger to stating shocking things, made two comments that, at least to the ears of left-leaning Corbynistas, will sound familiar.

Mr Trump claimed that Mr GW Bush had lied and that the recent Iraq War was wrong - and also that under Mr Bush, America had not become safer. That is like a Democrat saying Obamacare is rubbish, or Clinton should have been impeached.

It just isn't done. So that was amazing and intriguing.

The debate was also worth watching to see Mr Jeb Bush rise to the occasion, and come out confident and strong. Mr Kasich would be a compelling candidate if he had a chance - a smart, and nuanced moderate, his ideas seem more suited to compromise than the current culture wars warrant.

Mr Rubio stated - always dapper and acute - perh…

NOT-SO-SUPER BOWL

One of the best films of 2015 is called Concussion, and it stars Will Smith (the famous African-American actor) as a Nigerian (now-American) doctor, Bennet Omalu, who worked as a coroner's assistant doing forensic pathology in America's ageing rustbelt at the start of this century.

In a year when the Academy infamously declined to nominate any Black actors in their four categories, it is startling to report that this extraordinary performance from Smith - which sees him barely resemble his usual self - was overlooked in favour of the hammy ham-fisted work in Trumbo, for instance. Concussion, however, is more than an opportunity to observe, yet again, America's ongoing cultural and racial splits and struggles.

Instead, it is a film as terrifying in its ways as Invasion of the Body Snatchers, though based in real science this time; and as shocking and revelatory as The Insider, Michael Mann's late 90s story of whistleblowing and Big Tobacco. This time, the villain is so in…